make me choose
blushingsteve asked: Fight Club or The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo?

(Source: notbrandyalexanders, via bradleecoopers)

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via rklipman)

Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event, anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. This is where rocks bands list their requirement for green M&Ms (which is actually a surprisingly smart thing to do). This is also where a famous environmentalist requires a large gas-guzzling private jet to fly to the event city, but then requires an electric or hybrid car to take said environmentalist to the event venue when in view of the public.
When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found. He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact. Let’s hope that impact lives on without him. Thanks, Robin Williams- not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.
— Brian Lord.org  (via boysncroptops)

(Source: gypsy-hip, via growingupisforsuckers)

White people: You have to wait for the facts before you talk about Ferguson!
Eyewitnesses: He was on his knees with his hands up.
Medical examiner: There was no gunpowder residue on Mike Brown, no sign of struggle, and there were entry wounds on the inside of his arms and the top of his head, implying he was on his knees with his hands up.
Convenience store owner and clerk: There was no robbery and we didn't call the cops.
Ferguson PD: Okay, we admit it, Wilson didn't know anything happened at the convenience store and we determined no crime was committed.
...
...
...
White people: Nobody can say what happened! We still have to wait for the facts to come in!

bradleysbumchin:

it’s been exactly 10 years since Rachel got off that plane and I’m still not over it.

this is how you end a show. you don’t give the audience exactly what they want, or take it completely away from them either, you leave them with the idea of what could be

you don’t throw all sanity to hell in the hopes of going out with a bang, you go out with a warm hug and a thank you 

you don’t give the characters the perfect dream ending, you give them something better

and this is how you end a show that is so powerful, people are still emotional about it 10 years after it ends.

(Source: transponsters, via kellykapoor)

musingsofamodernpinup:

toughtink:

blairrrrbearrrr:

blairrrrbearrrr:

bbdsmeg1309:

mistress-maya:

irerisitahiri:

Disney Concept Art

Holy hell… these are so beautiful <o.o>

Gorgeous gorgeous gorgeous…………

Ariel though…

alright, i’ve seen this so many times on my dash that i finally have to call it out. some of these are concept art, some are not. how about giving credit where’s it’s due for fanartists and concept artists alike?

also, here’s some sources for these:

  1. Jasmine by Stacey Aoyama (the copyright ON the picture says 2009, way way way after the movie came out)
  2. Merida: actual concept art for Brave (possibly by Paul Abadilla and Matt Nolte, but i’m having trouble finding confirmation)
  3. Lion King: the best guess i have is attributing it to TLK-Ileana, though it doesn’t match the rest of this deviant’s gallery in style.
  4. Wreck it Ralph: i’m fairly certain this is a book illustration by Brittney Lee and not concept art (though obviously Brittney did do concept art for the movie as well)
  5. Frozen: actual concept art by Cory Loftis
  6. Ariel by Jenny Chung
  7. Cinderella: original production artwork by Mary Blair
  8. Rapunzel: actual concept art by Claire Keane
  9. Mulan by JonathanSung
  10. Hercules: actual concept art by Sue Nichols

^Thanks for being awesome.

(via thelustymonthofmeh)

silverheartdarkbluesoul:

"I just can’t say enough about the actors having faith and trust in the writers and the writers having faith and trust in the actors." - Kyle Chandler

THREE CASTS » Friday Night Lights

(via dillon-texas)